The Original Think Magazine (Published since 1996)
Another letter from AmericaAnother letter from America

Despite what you've seen or heard in Think Magazine and on the news lately, America is not what [ ... ]

+ Read More
Confessions of a dying financial supremacistConfessions of a dying financial supremacist

The conditions youth are revolting against today were planned 65 years ago...  [ ... ]

+ Read More
Corporate Warbots

We live in a world where the War Machine has taken over the Asylum.

+ Read More
Rememberances of the Cambodian NightmareRememberances of the Cambodian Nightmare

For any Cambodian over the age of 30, life has been a hard ride. From 1975 to 1979, the people of  [ ... ]

+ Read More

Corporate Warbots

We live in a world where the War Machine has taken over the Asylum.

Robot War Season (Click to Enlarge)

A few insightful quotes gleened from Remotely Piloted War, an article by Tom Engelhardt on the evolution of the US military from a citizen army to GloboTech Mech War. Yes, we're talking about the professional corporate war juggernaught with no authority or mandate from the people in whose name it rapes the planet for conflict. These probably do small justice, but hopefully whet your thirst to read the entire article.

So on the very day the Paris Peace Accords were signed in January 1973, officially signaling the end of U.S. involvement in Vietnam (though not quite its actual end), President Richard Nixon also signed a decree ending the draft. It was an admission of the obvious: war, American-style, as it had been practiced since World War II, had lost its hold on young minds….

War would now be fought not for or by the citizen, but quite literally for and by Lockheed Martin, Halliburton, KBR, DynCorp, Triple Canopy, and Blackwater (later Xe, even laterAcademi). Meanwhile, that citizen was to shudder at the thought of our terrorist enemies and then go on with normal life as if nothing whatsoever were happening.

“Get down to Disney World in Florida. Take your families and enjoy life the way we want it to be enjoyed,” was George W. Bush’s suggested response to the 9/11 attacks two weeks after they happened, with the “war on terror” already going on the books.)…

Big Corporation would take over the humblest of soldierly roles — the peeling of potatoes, the cooking of meals, the building of bases and outposts, the delivery of mail — and it would take up the gun (and the bomb) as well.

Soon enough, even the dying would be outsourced to corporate hirees. Occupied Iraq and Afghanistan would be flooded with tens of thousands of private contractors and hired guns, while military men trained in elite special operations units would find their big paydays by joining mercenary corporations doing similar work, often in the same war zones….

It was a remarkable racket. War and profit had long been connected in complicated ways, but seldom quite so straightforwardly. Now, win or lose on the battlefield, there would always be winners among the growing class of warrior corporations……

No one seemed to notice, but a 1% version of American war was coming to fruition, unchecked by a draft Army, a skeptical Congress, or a democratic citizenry. In fact, Americans, generally preoccupied with lives in which our wars played next to no part, paid little attention….

In this sense, think of us as moving from the citizen’s army to a roboticized, and finally robot, military — to a military that is a foreign legion in the most basic sense. In other words, we are moving toward an ever greater outsourcing of war to things that cannot protest, cannot vote with their feet (or wings), and for whom there is no “home front” or even a home at all.

 

Think Magazine on Facebook